Read the monologue for the role of Katharina from the script for Taming of the Shrew by William Shakespeare. What must Kate do before Petruchio will feed her (lines 38-47)? Kate's final speech (the longest one in the play) at the end of Shrew has perplexed critics, audiences, and students for centuries. Comic Monologues for Men • Comic Monologues for Women • Dramatic Monologues for Men • Dramatic Monologues for Women Classical Monologues for Men • Classical Monologues for Women • Monologues for Seniors • Monologues for ChildrenCopyright © 2005 - 2020 Monologue Archive. Katherine's Monologue from The Taming of the Shrew including context, text and video example. KATHERINE. Yet another one is that Kate intended to be a "good" wife all along, but just wanted a strong husband. Even the wedding guests can't believe how much her behavior has changed. Like many other of Shakespeare's comedies, The Taming of the Shrew features a woman as one of the story's chief protagonists. The Taming of the Shrew. The Taming of the Shrew. Read the monologue for the role of Katharina from the script for Taming of the Shrew by William Shakespeare. Taming of the Shrew Essay May 31, 2014. Petruchio tells Kate to tell the others what their duty is, and she extols complete obedience to one’s husband. Katherine’s Rebellion, Repression and Resistance: Feminist Perspective of The Taming of the Shrew The Taming of the Shrew by William Shakespeare is a controversial play that arouses a debate over the role of Katherine. First, as you know, my house within the city. After she marries Petruchio, Petruchio tries to "tame" her, and he forces her into obedience by withholding food from her and not letting her sleep. It blots thy beauty as frosts do bite the meads, Confounds thy fame as whirlwinds shake fair buds, And in no sense is meet or amiable. In Act 5, Scene 2, Katherine has a monologue where she explains why women must be obedient to their husbands. First line: They shall go forward, Kate, at thy command. unknit that threatening unkind brow, Hence comes it that your kindred shuns your house, Be patient, gentlemen; I choose her for myself, Even as a flatt'ring dream or worthless fancy. The Taming of the Shrew Introduction. Well, come, my Kate; we will unto your father's. 44. Read full Petruchio Monologue; 6. It did inspire a very robust musical called Kiss Me Kate which is enjoyed by audiences. Shakespeare — Taming of the Shrew monologue Great for young actresses, this 2-3 minute monologue is spoken by Kate, the protagonist in William Shakespeare's comedic play, The Taming of the Shrew. Katherina has the largest and most well-known speech in the final scene of the play. print/save view : Previous scene: Play menu: Next scene Act IV, Scene 3. Fie, fie, unknit that threat'ning unkind... Katharina (Katherine / Kate) Minola. Yet another, for the last monologue, though it requires some side gags: Kate gets in on the bet and delivers the last monologue to get her and Petruchio the money. No, no, forsooth; I dare not for my life. Petruchio - IV iii 163. Katherine Minola is a fiery, spirited woman, and as such, the male dominated world around her doesn't quite know what to do with her. The more my wrong, the more his spite appears. Women. KATE: Fie, fie, unknit that threat'ning unkind brow. Taming of the Shrew Kate's Monologue / Final Scene - YouTube Though most of the play’s characters simply believe Katherine to be inherently ill-tempered, it is … Written by William Shakespeare between 1590 and 1594, it's one of Shakespeare's earliest Comedies – it's also one of his most controversial works. Summary Read a Plot Overview of the entire play or a scene by scene Summary and Analysis. The Taming of the Shrew is a comic play written by William Shakespeare around 1590 and first published in 1898. The play Taming of the Shrew by William Shakespeare, written in 1590-1592, takes place in Italy. 2. Characters Women Katherina (Act 3, Scene 2) Katherina (Act 4, Privacy Policy • Theatre Links. No, not a whit; I find you passing gentle. Even in these honest mean habiliments; Our purses shall be proud, our garments poor; For 'tis the mind that makes the body rich; The more my wrong, the more his spite appears. What does Kate's opening monologue reveal about her condition? Learn The Taming of the Shrew is the story of how Petruchio, the money-grubbing wife hunter, transforms the aggressive and bad-tempered Katherine Minola into an obedient, honey-tongued trophy wife. The Taming of the Shrew was first performed around 1594, making it one of the earliest of Shakespeare's comedies. (201 lines) 45. A Controversial Comedy. Katharina says: No shame but mine: I must, forsooth, be … The Taming of the Shrew As with all of his plays Shakespeare brings his many characters to life with memorable dialogue and some memorable quotes. And dart not scornful glances from those eyes. Character monologues from Shakespeare’s play The Taming of the Shrew. She constantly insults and degrades the men around her, and she is prone to wild displays of anger, during which she may physically attack whomever enrages her. Bianca leads the two away and the men begin discussing their wives. The Taming of the Shrew Quotes by William Shakespeare. Katharina says: No shame but mine: I must, forsooth, be … Looking for The Taming of the Shrew quotes? I choose her for myself; Even as a flatt'ring dream or worthless fancy. Baptista’s Monologue I am alone and dreaming of my girls They’ve gone away to houses of their own Oh Kate is married to a mean old jerk She used to be a shrew but now she’s not Because he starved her, kept her up all night Bianca lives in happiness and glee At least to me that’s how it seems to be The man was rich and seemed to care for her Bonnie’s Analysis of The Taming of the Shrew. Much of what we know about Kate initially comes from what other people say about her. It blots thy. * Classical Monologue * Play: The Taming of the Shrew (Act 4, Scene 3) Author: William Shakespeare Character: Kate Posted: Aug. 6, 2019. Summary Read a Plot Overview of the entire play or a scene by scene Summary and Analysis. To wound thy lord, thy king, thy governor. No shame but mine; I must, forsooth, be forc'd, Well, come, my Kate; we will unto your father's. The Widow insults Katherina for a shrew, and Hortensio and Petruchio make bets on who will win the battle of wits. The Taming of the Shrew. The Shakescleare modern English translation of The Taming of the Shrew makes it easy to decipher Shakespeare’s nuanced language and will help you appreciate all of the play’s most famous lines--like “If I be waspish, best beware my sting.” Katherine is the "shrew" of the play's title. Some people regard Katherine as an anti-feminist protagonist. … This monologue can be interpreted in many different ways. 2. Verse. They shall go forward, Kate, at thy command. I,1,353 [To BAPTISTA] I pray you, sir, is it your will To make a stale of me amongst these mates? A woman mov'd is like a fountain troubled—. Kate’s speech in Act 5, scene 2 of Shakespeare’s Taming of the Shrew is proof of her strong use of sarcasm. Join StageAgent today and unlock amazing theatre resources and opportunities. Katherine monologue from Taming of the Shrew by William Shakespeare. The nobleman then has the play performed for Sly's diversion. Happy Tuesday! Petruchio is then ready to marry Katherine, even against her will. Widely reputed throughout Padua to be a shrew, Katherine is foul-tempered and sharp-tongued at the start of the play. Taming of the Shrew, Katherine’s Monologue – arleigh curry's school blog. To wound thy lord, thy king, thy governor. Muddy, ill-seeming, thick, bereft of beauty; And while it is so, none so dry or thirsty. Katherina. Unknit that threat'ning unkind brow. The Taming of the Shrew - Play. Speeches (Lines) for Katherina in "Taming of the Shrew" Total: 82. print/save view. No, not a whit: I find you passing gentle. Well, come, my Kate; we will unto your father's. Read our selection of the very best quotes from Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew along with speaker, act and scene. Obey the bride, you that attend on her; Read full Petruchio Monologue; 5. The Taming of the Shrew is a comedy by William Shakespeare, believed to have been written between 1590 and 1592.The play begins with a framing device, often referred to as the induction, in which a mischievous nobleman tricks a drunken tinker named Christopher Sly into believing he is actually a nobleman himself. OPTIONS: Show cue speeches • Show full speeches # Act, Scene, Line (Click to see in context) Speech text: 1. The submissiveacceptance of the wives in the source stories is illustrated in play during the energetic, sparkling, and finally loving exchange between Petruchio and Katherine. No shame but mine. No shame but mine; I must, forsooth, be forc'd. What, did he marry me to famish me? Verse. 1. Katherine, the shrew of the play’s title, certainly acts much changed. Fie, fie! 46. Petruchio believes that women should do what their men say. No Shame but mine: I must, forsooth, be... Katharina (Katherine / Kate) Minola. All rights reserved. At the beginning of her monologue, she begins with the strong rebuke, “Fie, fie. unknit that threatening unkind brow. Hortensio and Lucentio are amazed at what Petruchio has managed to accomplish. Be patient, gentlemen. Speeches (Lines) for Katherina in "Taming of the Shrew" Total: 82. print/save view. First Line: Thus have I politicly begun my reign, And ’tis my hope to end successfully. With this monologue being able to change the main concept in this play, I think that readers perceive this monologue as I do. the dress? We know that Kate has outwardly transformed by the time she finishes her lengthy monologue about a wife's duty to her husband. However, in fact, if we delve into it, adapting feminist The Shakescleare modern English translation of The Taming of the Shrew makes it easy to decipher Shakespeare’s nuanced language and will help you appreciate all of the play’s most famous lines--like “If I be waspish, best beware my sting.” A woman moved is like a fountain troubled, They shall go forward, Kate, at thy command, Fie, fie! The Taming of the Shrew. I must forsooth be forc'd, The more my wrong, the more his spite appears. And dart not scornful glances from those eyes. She is known throughout the town for her angry abrasive manner. This Shakespeare play is not often touted as a favorite. The Taming of the Shrew. THE TAMING OF THE SHREW. Location: Act IV, sc. It can be interpreted that Katherine has fully been tamed by Petruchio, that she is being sarcastic and mocking Petruchio, or something…. No shame but mine. Because she is stubborn, is sometimes ill-mannered, and does not allow herself to be ordered around by men, she is constantly insulted, made fun of, and otherwise denigrated by practically all the other characters in the play. In this video, Mark Quartley shares some of the things he looks for to help him understand how a character is feeling in a monologue. The Taming of the Shrew - Play. The Taming of the Shrew is a comic play written by William Shakespeare around 1590 and first published in 1898. The monologue Katherine has in Act 5, Scene 2, can change a main plot in this play. To wound thy lord, thy king, thy governor. Hence comes it that your kindred shuns your house. In The Taming of the Shrew, Kate goes through an amazing . Katherina (Act 3, Scene 2) Katherina (Act 4, Scene 3) Katherina (Act 5, Scene 2) Men. Katherina is a very different main character than most of Shakespeare’s heroines. To give my hand, oppos'd against my heart, Unto a mad-brain rudesby, full of spleen, Who woo'd in haste and means to wed at leisure. Learn Join StageAgent today and unlock amazing theatre resources and opportunities. Kate - III ii 8. PETRUCHIO’S house Enter KATHERINA and GRUMIO Grumio. Character: PETRUCHIO. It can change from being an extremely feminist play to being a play about actually fulling taming a shrew. I must forsooth be forc'd. Characters. Katherine's Monologue from The Taming of the Shrew including context, text and video example. What does Petruchio tell Hortensio to do in line 162? Fie, fie! Download Free Monologue (PDF Format) The fruits of Petruchio's 'taming' are seen at the very end of the play. The book is a comedy, mainly about Petruchio and his wife Kate. 1. The Taming of the Shrew: Kate’s soliloquy Kate’s soliloquy bring about a joyous conclusion to The Taming of the Shrew. It tells us a lot about how she feels about marriage, female roles and the changes in her behaviour since marrying Petruchio. Monologues (Male) Monologues (Female) Overdone Monologues Scene Study (M+F) ... Taming of the Shrew: Act 5, Scene 2 Jump to a scene. KATE: Fie, fie, unknit that threat'ning unkind browAnd dart not scornful glances from those eyesTo wound thy lord, thy king, thy governor.It blots thy beauty as frosts do bite the meads,Confounds thy fame as whirlwinds shake fair buds,And in no sense is meet or amiable.A woman moved is like a fountain troubled,Muddy, ill-seeming, thick, bereft of beauty,And while it is so, none so dry or thirstyWill deign to sip or touch one drop of it.Thy husband is thy lord, thy life, thy keeper,Thy head, thy sovereign; one that cares for theeAnd for thy maintenance; commits his bodyTo painful labor both by sea and land,To watch the night in storms, the day in cold,Whilst thou li'st warm at home, secure and safe;And craves no other tribute at thy handsBut love, fair looks, and true obedience--Too little payment for so great a debt.Such duty as the subject owes the prince,Even such a woman oweth to her husband;And when she is froward, peevish, sullen, sour,And not obedient to his honest will,What is she but a foul contending rebelAnd graceless traitor to her loving lord?I am ashamed that women are so simpleTo offer war where they should kneel for peace,Or seek for rule, supremacy, and sway,Whey they are bound to serve, love, and obey.Why are our bodies soft and weak and smooth,Unapt to toil and trouble in the world,But that our soft conditions and our heartsShould well agree with our external parts?Come, come, you froward and unable worms,My mind hath been as big as one of yours,My heart as great, my reason haply more,To bandy word for word and frown for frown.But now I see our lances are but straws,Our strength as weak, our weakness past compare,That seeming to be most which we indeed least are.Then vail your stomachs, for it is no boot,And place your hands below your husband's foot,In token of which duty, if he please,My hand is ready, may it do him ease. Petruchio takes money from Bianca’s suitors to woo her, since Katherine must marry before her sister by her father’s decree; he also arranges the dowry with her father. Character monologues from Shakespeare’s play The Taming of the Shrew. Petruchio’s goal with Kate is to tame her. It blots thy beauty as frosts do bite the meads, Confounds thy fame as whirlwinds shake fair buds, And in no sense is meet or amiable. What does Petruchio think of the hat? The audience leaves the theatre with a pleasant feeling, glad that such a shrew could be tamed so well. Featured Monologues.